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Thank you for visiting Grandma's Briefs, where I write on the good, bad, humorous and heartwarming of being a baby boomer, grandparent, parent to adult children, wife and writer. Peruse the place, leave a comment or two, and feel free to email me any time at

Meet the family

 grandpa and grandma)
Jim (longtime hubby) and Lisa (me)

brianna and patrick
Brianna (oldest daughter) and Patrick (her boyfriend)

 Preston and Megan
Preston (son-in-law) and Megan (middle daughter)

Matt (Andrea's fiancé) and Andrea (youngest daughter)

three grandsons
Bubby, Jak, and Mac — Bloggy nicknames of Gramma's stars (Megan and Preston's boys)



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    Falling TVs

    Toys? Who needs toys when the TV's on!?Last week there was an article in the paper about the rising number of children being hurt by furniture. The article mentioned a variety of ways kids are seriously injured by big objects such as bookcases and more, but all I could focus on was the television stat:

    Injuries to children from falling televisions and other furniture have increased by more than 40 percent since 1990, according to a study published in May in the journal Clinical Pediatrics. Each year, 14,700 children in the U.S. - most of them under 6 years old - are hospitalized with such injuries, with nearly half struck by televisions.

    My reason for zoning in on the TV bit? Because Bubby zones out when the TV is on. He LOVES the television and sees nothing and no one when Elmo or any other singing plush animal fills the screen.

    Yes, I have a tendency to be overprotective and a tad paranoid about unlikely things happening to my children. OK, I admit, I'm kind of a freak about such things, and my reaction to this article is continued proof that I'll be the same way with my grandchildren.

    It's not that I think Megan won't (and isn't) doing the necessary things to protect Bubby, but I'm older, I've been around longer, I've learned about all the scary and deadly things that could befall my loved ones ... and continue to learn. I've read a lot more, especially considering that as a former parenting magazine editor I read copious copy about horrible happenings and how to protect the little ones.

    But besides all that, Bubby LOVES the television! And now that he's mobile, he LOVES to climb on things. A formula for disaster, if ever there was one. And thanks to my overactive imagination, I can see that big ol' magical box that displays Elmo and all kinds of happy-happy, joy-joy goodness for Bubby smashing my little buddy to bits when he pulls the damn thing off the shelf.

    I have to temper my cries of "Danger! Danger!" to Megan, though, since she's already tired of my freakouts that started from the minute I learned she was pregnant. "Here's a newfangled gadget to count the number of times the baby has moved so your child's not stillborn!" "Bassinette? Don't get a basinette! Studies have shown SIDS is much higher for babies in basinettes!" "Do NOT put pillows in the baby's crib or he'll suffocate!" "Grapes? You're not allowing him to eat GRAPES, are you??".

    No, I have to be subtle about my warnings going forward, as I think she's turning a deaf ear to my panic. So I'll just post my concerns on this blog. I'm doing nothing more than passing along some information I ran across. I'm not freaking out. Really, Megan, I'm not. I'm not begging you to BLOCK OFF THE TV SO BUBBY CAN'T GET TO IT! Honest. It's just an idea ... But you really may want to consider it ....



    What a difference a year makes

    When Bubby was born, certain aspects of our family life were a given. One given was that my husband and I had decent jobs, making a decent salary, and we were able to fly to visit our grandson as often as our accrued vacation hours allowed. But then the winds of change rolled in. Six months after Bubby was born, my job was outsourced and I've yet to find employment. And my husband's job is set for outsourcing next month, with no new job on the horizon. Needless to say, money is tight.

    But it's just money.* The more important changes in the past year have involved life and death. Lower on the scale of importance - but still heart-wrenching - was the death of our 12-year-old family dog, Moses. When Bubby was born, I envisioned Moses, a black lab/collie mix, being a major attraction for Bubby when visiting our home, with the two of them enjoying endless games of fetch. It wasn't to be, though, as Moses had an appointment in heaven and won't be around to befriend Bubby.

    High on the scale of importance, though, is the loss of my mother-in-law, aka Granny, who, although still living, is "just not there" mentally or physically, thanks to several strokes. When Bubby was born, Granny was thrilled about her newest great-grandson. When she first met him, she kind of freaked out Bubby's mommy by continually stating, "This is MY baby," and refusing to let others hold the baby. Megan knew it was a joke, but she did worry about the way Granny clutched the newborn. It was just love, not lunacy. But Megan no longer needs to worry about that. Granny will never be the Granny we all once knew. She recognizes few family members, is unable to maintain a conversation, cannot walk without assistance, wears a diaper. And she will never cuddle Bubby again.

    It breaks my heart that Bubby will never get to know Granny, never get to hear her too-oft-repeated stories about her son (Bubby's grandpa). He'll never get to listen to her sing hymns in a voice reminiscent of a wanna-be opera diva. He'll never be one of the lucky kiddos who knew they had a rapt audience in Granny, no matter how long-winded and rambling the child's story may be.

    It sucks. It's sad. It's the worst change we've faced in the past year. And it's one that's not as easily remedied as finding new employment or picking out a new dog.


    *It's easy to be blase in a blog, but the reality is that it's scaring the hell out of me!


    Body painting

    I bought Bubby some fingerpaints as a birthday gift so when I received an e-mail from Megan with "body painting" as the subject, I figured I'd open it to see a precious display of reds, yellows and greens all over my grandson's body. A true work of art.

    This is what the e-mail said:

    Big Bubby decided to do some body painting for our anniversary - what a sweetie, huh! Oh yeah, did I mention he was painting with what he found in his diaper?

    And this was the picture:

    Ugh! Of course, my first question was, "Why in the world is his poop so black!?" Well, turns out Bubby had a pint of blueberries to himself the day before.

    It's this kind of thing that makes me oh-so happy to be Grandma, not Mom!


    And so it begins

    This is my first post on Grandma's Briefs, my spot for snippets and snark on the state of parenting redux. And, of course, I'll be posting plenty of photos of my grandson "Bubby," the most handsome grandson in the country.

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