Review: The American Sandbox Dictionary of Children's Mispronounced English

Grandmas love all things precious, and there's a new book out that lands smack dab in that category. The American Sandbox Dictionary of Children's Mispronounced English by Alvin Zamudio is filled with nothing but precious quotes from kiddos. Well, there are a few anecdotes from parents on how their children concocted the minced pronunciation, but other than those, the book is a true A to Z compilation of cuteness.

To wit, here are a few highlights in the book, culled from hundreds of adorable mispronunciations and their intended definitions that parents across the country submitted to the www.americansandbox.com website:

ding • bell [DEENG-behl] noun A bell or chime triggered by a button outside of a door or portal that announces someone's presence. "Mom, the dingbell is ringing!" —Will, age 2, Collinsville, OK; Halina, age 5, San Antonio, TX

ne • ces • sa • ny [nuh-SESS-uh-nee] noun Anything indispensable or vital to survival, such as food, shelter, or a new purse. "But I have to have it, Mommy, it's a necessany!" —Evangeline, age 2, Sherwood, AR

My favorites though, solely because they're mispronunciations shared by my precious Bubby, are:

Man • y • nems [MENN-ee-nemz] proper noun A world-famous confection of milk chocolate with a hard-candy shell tha may not melt in your hands but will certainly have disastrous results if left in children's pockets for long periods of time. "Mommy, can I have some more Manynems? Mine are all melted?" Also pronounced Nim-Nims —Christopher, age 2, Colorado Springs, CO. Additional source: Tala, age 3, Belleville, IL

pack • pack [PAK-pak] noun A lightweight carrying bag with straps that allows it to be carried on the back, typically made of cloth or nylon that also can be colored or decorated, such as with an image or emblem of a popular media character. "I have a Supergirl packpack!" —Evelyn, age 2, Richmond Hill, GA

There are hundreds more, from accident (it's not what you think) to yummy bear (it is what you think). Zamudio also thoughtfully included a few lined pages at the end for readers to keep their own "My Journal of Mispronounced Words." You can bet I'll be adding goodies from Bubby and, eventually, Birdy there, as they come my way. I may even join the throng of parents -- and grandparents -- submitting precious pronunciations on the website. I'm willing to bet on a second edition of this sure-to-be-popular guide to all good things coming straight outta the mouths of babes; maybe mispronunciations from Bubby and Birdy will find a place there.

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